Food, glorious food: Bryar

Food, food, glorious food!

Now, I don’t claim to be a foodie myself (can’t cook for my life either) so I’m not an authority – but believe me when I say that Japanese food is seriously amazing. Maybe because it’s so different to most food you can find in New Zealand, yet still similar enough to be familiar. I think the only thing I look forward to and savour in NZ as much as the food here, is probably a burger from Burger Fuel (I told you, I have pretty simple tastes). So, this blog post is going to be dedicated to convincing you of the same thing! Here we go…

First off, here’s some examples.

It would take me forever to list off all of the Japanese dishes that I love, so I’ll settle for describing a few. Firstly, tonkatsu. Literally ‘pork cutlet’, deep fried in bread crumbs with sweet sauce, rice and salad. It’s simple, but the combination of the tender pork and the crunchy bread crumb is perfection itself. Udon, soba, and ramen…all are noodle dishes of different types, can be eaten hot or cold, and can be made with an infinite array of soups, meats, toppings and seasonings. Sukiyaki is a Japanese classic; beef slices, vegetables and basically anything you like slow cooked in a hot pot at your table. Once it’s cooked, take a slice of beef and dip it in raw egg (my mouth is watering just imagining it).

You can get a feed for next to nothing.

There’s a lot of crazy expensive restaurants in Tokyo, but they’re pretty well balanced out by the number of places you can get a meal for really cheap. Take Yoshinoya for example; a chain restaurant that can be found pretty much anywhere, specialising in gyudon (beef bowl). You can get a medium sized bowl for 380yen (that’s just under five bucks), and don’t go thinking that price indicates quality – this might be one of my favourite dishes of all time.

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And it’s super convenient.

With a convenience store, row of vending machines or fast food chain around almost every corner, one thing Japan could never be accused of is being inconvenient. You never have to worry about getting thirsty when you’re out and about, because I can (almost) guarantee you that no matter where you are, there will be at least one vending machine in sight offering everything from water to iced coffee and occasionally ice cream on a cone. Convenience stores (of which there are a lot) are also your best friend when you’re heading home after your 7pm lecture and really can’t be bothered trying to scrounge something up. A vast array of pre-made meals are on offer, which the person behind the counter will kindly offer to heat up for you, and a complimentary plastic fork is even included in the deal.

The snacks and desserts are to die for.

Last but not least, let’s quickly talk about Japanese desserts and snacks. If you’re a fan of delicate cakes, pastries and cute sweet treats then Japan is the place for you. I personally am in love with the ice creams here, especially yukimi-daifuku; a little ball of vanilla ice cream wrapped in a thin layer of soft mochi (rice cake). I could eat them every day and I don’t think I would ever get sick of them.

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There’s only one let down…

And that’s natto – fermented soy beans. It’s brown, it’s sticky, it smells strange and, well, it’s fermented. Japanese people love it, but I’m yet to meet a foreigner who will say the same. I’m thinking it’s like vegemite or marmite in New Zealand; if you grow up with it then you probably love it, but if you think about it it does taste a little weird. Needless to say, I won’t be converting any time soon.

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That’s all for today guys! I hope you’re not too hungry now (I definitely am).

Until next time, happy food-ing!

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Accommodation Awards: Bryar

What’s this folks? It seems we have a late entry! Nominated by Miss B. C. Renshaw, AZALEA HOUSE in Tokyo, Japan for the Accommodation Award “Most Deceptive Outward Appearance”! (Applause all around).

Alright, now that I’ve pretended to be a game show announcer, let me explain to you why I think that my dormitory would hands-down win this (somewhat questionable) award.

The saying “Don’t judge a book by its cover” has never been more appropriate. My dormitory in Japan looks from the outside, and I’ll say it bluntly, like an abandoned prison block. It’s got the whole works – flickering fluorescent lights, barbed wire to prevent access to the roof, water stains down the walls, security cameras watching our every move, and that general prison-y appearance. Here’s a little collage I made for your viewing pleasure;

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This couldn’t be more of a contrast to the cosy, clean interior of my dorm room itself. This place is fully carpeted and equipped with its own air conditioning unit, kitchenette, bathroom, and a sliding door leading to a small private balcony, featuring a bug screen for the summer time. Thanks to administration and the room’s previous tenant my place is also fully furnished; bed, desk, chair, bookshelf, wardrobe and even a full-length mirror were already in place when I arrived. The bathroom boasts a toilet, sink and mirror, shower (with amazing water pressure) and bath, and the kitchen is fully functional with electric element (which works surprisingly well), sink, cupboards, and a refrigerator.

My room has become my sanctuary since arriving in Japan; it’s a place I can relax and feel at home, somewhere study in peace, a place I can return to at the end of every day that is familiar and comfortable. I’ve made my room feel more like home by personalising it; I put up a couple of posters on the walls, bought a scent diffuser, put down mats on the floor, and decided on designated places for things to go.

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Two different views of my cozy room

The drawbacks, aside from the slightly dodgy initial impression (which we can look past because we don’t judge based on appearance), are few and far between. This place isn’t your cheapest option, although most are more expensive there are a few which are cheaper. On top of this, utility fees and washing/drying expenses are not included in monthly rent. There is around a 45-minute commute into Sophia university, and seeing as we’re on the north-western outskirts of Tokyo, getting into the central city will take around the same amount of time. Dormitory rules are also quite strict regarding having guests over, and especially having guests sleep over, but these rules are quite typical to Japan and you’ll pay a lot more to stay in a share-house with more freedom. In saying this, there were dormitories that I looked into that were far stricter, to the point of segregating female and male living areas by the use of locked doors and key-cards, and Azalea house is nowhere near as controlled.

These drawbacks however are far outweighed by the overall advantages of living in Azalea House. The surrounding neighbourhood is quiet and safe, with a kindergarten and primary school just down the road. The main street of the district (Heiwadai) is within easy walking distance, and offers multiple supermarkets, convenience stores, a post office, fast food, the local station and more. Although the train ride into Tokyo proper can take the better part of an hour, Shibuya and Harajuku (pop-culture centrals) are on the same line as Heiwadai, so it’s a simple direct commute. Azalea House might be home to 80 young university exchange students from around the world, but I’m often surprised by the fact that I can hear hardly anything from the rooms either side of me. Ahh, peace and quiet! Last but not least, if you’re new to living by yourself in Tokyo then the lady who works in the office on the ground floor during the day is an absolute angel and will help you with everything from paying your bills, to directing you to around the neighbourhood, to alerting you when the care packages from your mother stuffed full of chocolate arrive on the doorstep.

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The view from the balcony, down into the little zen garden of the next-door-neighbour, in my room on the fourth floor

This is my first time living by myself at all let alone in a foreign country. So far I’m absolutely loving it. I’m learning how to better manage my time, how to stick to a routine, and I’m finding that I’m really enjoying the independence of having to cook and clean for myself and pay my own bills. My situation is by no means a definitive view into student accommodation in Japan, and is very independent compared other options like share-houses and dormitories with communal facilities. I think that’s one of the things I love most about it, but if you’re a very social person then something like this might not be quite to your taste. If you’re considering coming to Japan on a student exchange then I encourage you to check out all your options, and find one that suits you best!

Jya, mata! See ya!

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My O-Week Experience: Bryar

Hi all!

Firstly, let me apologise for the delay on this post; I arrived in Japan on the 23rd of March but have only just made it through my orientation and first week of university classes. I say that like it was a real trial, but the truth is that these last couple of weeks have set me up for an awesome year ahead!

The semester here in Japan starts in April (spring), and I was only able to move into my dormitory on the 1st. For the week-or-so between arriving and moving in I stayed with a friend from my high school exchange, who also helped me to buy everything I needed to kit out my dorm room. I also used this time to settle back into Japanese life, adjust myself to the hustle and bustle of Tokyo and shake the rust off my Japanese.

Having lived here before, the culture shock isn’t so much of an issue for me this time around, but anyone who is planning to make the move from New Zealand to Japan for the first time should be prepared for a few things;

  1. Japanese society is quite strict when it comes to how you are expected to act – respect your elders, be modest about your achievements, always give your all in everything you do.
  2. There are 1,001 unspoken rules for conducting yourself in public. Always stand to the left of an escalator in Toyko, but on the right in Osaka. Walk on the left side of the pathway, always give your seat to an elderly person, never eat while walking, and don’t be that loud obnoxious foreigner on the train.
  3. If you’re not Asian, you’ll stick out. Maybe not so much in the central city, but as soon as you get into the suburbs or less-touristy places, you’ll get stares. Depending on what kind of person you are you’ll either love it or hate it, but either way you’ll grow used to it eventually.
  4. On the positive side, there are convenience stores and/or vending machines around almost every corner, and the trains and busses are very rarely ever late (cough Auckland Transport). Also, the toilet seats are heated which is a godsend in winter.

 

Meiji Shrine in Tokyo with a recently arrived high school exchange student

It’s supposed to be spring, but you can see from the above photo that there’s still a chill in the air (understatement of the year – it snowed around the time this photo was taken). But in saying that, I sit here writing this in a t-shirt with my balcony door flung wide open, so in a matter of three weeks the temperature has gone from NZ winter to NZ summer.

My actual Sophia University orientation was quite a small affair. Two meetings were held for new exchange students over two days, during which we were given a tour of the (typically small) campus, shown how to enrol for classes and given a placement test to determine which Japanese stream we would be entered into. An international student welcome dinner was held in the cafeteria a couple of nights before classes started, which was basically an all-you-can-eat-buffet combined with a meet-and-greet.

A shot of the street leading to Sophia University, lined with spring cherry blossoms

The great thing about being a foreign exchange student in Japan (or, I’m sure, in any country) is that the feeling of being in the same boat tends to throw people together, and makes it very easy to find friends. I met an American girl on the first day of orientation who happens to live on the same train line as me, and we’ve done almost everything together since. And if my university orientation was slightly lacking, I can’t say that I haven’t been very effectively introduced to Japanese drinking culture. My host mum gravely informs me that Japanese university students are wild, uncontrollable alcoholics, and I nod my head and attempt to look concerned. Just like any country around the world, Japanese university students love to socialise and have fun, and the Japanese izakaya makes that all the more possible!

The izakaya is essentially a Japanese bar, usually decked out with traditional furnishings and a warm atmosphere. The staff are friendly and jovial, and if you’re early enough you might be in time for nomihoudai – “open bar” – pay a fixed amount and drink as much as you like for a certain time period. The food in these places is more like finger-food than actual meals, and it all adds to the fun, relaxed, social mood.

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“Welcome to Japan from New Zealand! Please have a great time here!” A gift from the lovely Nee-san who served us at an izakaya

That basically sums up my few weeks of settling in here, please look forward to my submission to the accommodation awards, coming very soon! If you want to know anything else about what I’ve been up to, how I’m finding living here in Tokyo, more pro-tips about cultural differences in Japan, or any other thing you can think of, flick me an email! I’d love to hear from you guys.

Mata ne! Bye for now!

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What I’m Packing: Bryar

Packing might be the trickiest part of any trip, let alone packing for an exchange – which means fitting a year’s worth of clothes and items into a suitcase weighing no more than twenty-three KG and a carry-on under seven. Where on earth to begin? Is among some thoughts that come to mind.

I’m considering one major thing before starting my list; when I arrive in Japan (mid-March) it will be the beginning of spring, which means still pretty freezing. Because I can’t realistically fit all of my clothes into my suitcase, most of it is going to have to be winter gear to deal with the cold when I arrive. In terms of summer clothes I’ll pack the ones I absolutely can’t live without, but for the most part I’ll be buying new clothes as the seasons come along (under the assumption that I’ll actually have money to spend).

So what exactly am I packing? The bare essentials, basically. Here’s a rough list:

Clothing:

  • My harem pants and sweatpants, because comfort is key and I would live in these if I could.
  • Wool-lined coat and gloves and woollen scarf – being from Auckland NZ I have to wrap up like an Eskimo to survive the snow in winter.
  • Slippers for wearing inside, because in Japanese houses you leave your outside shoes in the genkan (entrance way) and wear slippers inside the house for cleanliness.
  • Earrings, because I know for a fact that sterling silver earrings are hard to come by in Japan.

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Electronics:

  • My earbuds. No Music. No Life.
  • An e-reader (that I have yet to buy) to avoid the temptation of buying 100 paperback books throughout the year.
  • My laptop for sensible things like study and emails and watching JDrama.
  • A camera? – I haven’t decided on this one yet because I could just rely on my phone for photos.
  • Plug adaptors (maybe two or three).

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Misc:

  • A couple of posters and my pillow slip to make my room feel more like ‘home’ as soon as I get there.
  • My map of the Tokyo train system and my SUICA (one of the train passes used in Japan)
  • Enough cash to get me through a couple of days until I find the nearest ATM – cards are rarely used in stores in Japan; people prefer to carry large amounts of cash.
  • An agenda/diary/planner ie. life-saver.
  • New Zealand souvenirs.

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There are also some things I know I’m definitely not going to pack, including use-up-able things like shampoo, conditioner and soap, and bulky things like a hairdryer which I know are cheap enough to buy once I’ve arrived.

This list is likely to change before I leave in three months’ time, and it’s also likely that I’ll end up begging my parents to ship me things I’ve forgotten halfway through the year, but here we are for now!

If you’ve got any stellar suggestions for what I should be packing or questions about anything else, let me know in an email.

Until next time!

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